HOW NOT TO MAKE A TERRARIUM

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Since spotting London Terrariums’ beautiful miniature gardens in Ernest Journal, making a terrarium has been high up on my wish list.

Terrariums were, initially, a Victorian obsession.  Originally used as a means of transporting botanical specimens on long sea voyages, a terrarium is essentially a controlled microclimate, which means that once the two week incubation period has passed, this miniature garden shouldn’t need much attention.

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You can either make an ‘open’ or ‘closed’ terrarium.  Open vessels are best for succulents and cacti, and closed containers for tropical humidity-loving plants such as mosses, orchids, ferns and air-plants.

When I set out to make my terrarium I’d somehow missed this vital bit of information – I think actually I’d chosen to miss it – on one hand I was really excited about foraging in my local park for some mosses and ferns, but also really wanted to pop a succulent in there.  The result … a very pretty looking open terrarium for about two weeks until everything died except for the succulent and the plastic dinosaur … oops!  Well at least you won’t make the same mistake now…

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These magical worlds – when thought out properly – make brilliant presents, and there are bundles of terrarium tutorials over on our Terrarium Inspiration board on Pinterest.  You can either teach yourself, buy a kit, or try out one of London Terrariums’ workshops.  It’s £60 for a two hour workshop – I haven’t tried one myself but they come highly recommended.

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If you make a terrarium, we’d love to see it!  Share pictures of your green fingered success using the hashtag  #MadeWithMolly and tag us @mollyandthewolf.  Also, if you have any terrarium tips, tutorials or workshops to recommend, we’d love to know.

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